UCAS, a guide.

   UCAS was an extremely daunting experience for me. Applying for universities when you’ve only been out of high school for a year seemed so abstract. University… already? It didn’t seem right at all. It’s a difficult time and the amount of advice being thrown at you left right and centre can be overwhelming. If it wasn’t for my really helpful tutor at school I don’t think my application would have been half it was. Therefore I decided to create this short and very simple guide to pass on my pearls of UCAS wisdom for those who are applying for this new 2014 cycle.

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Results Day

   My first real results day was in August 2011. I’d completed my GCSEs and was waiting to see how I’d done. To me, the exams meant very little. I was sure I’d get the 5 A-C grades I needed for my sixth form entry therefore I didn’t feel under much pressure at all. However, August 15th 2013 was completely different. After a rather shaky start to sixth form where I got ADDE in my first bout of January exams, results days have always been tainted with a sense of self doubt and second guessing. A levels were much harder and much more fast paced and I wasn’t sure I was cut out for them whatsoever. The looming fear of missing university offers hanging overhead only accentuates the nervousness and general sick feeling at the pit of your stomach. 

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Five Great Things to Do This Summer

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   It’s a common misconception that once you finish your A Levels you’re going to be walking on a cloud of sunshine, happiness and rainbows. It is NOT the case! I finished failed my A Levels 2 weeks ago and other than weeping for two days following a horrible final exam I’ve done nothing! My expectations of soaking up the sunshine in a beer garden somewhere with a few jugs of Pimms and crates of Cider never seemed to materialise. Now I’m sitting at home constantly anxious about results day and thinking WTF am I going to do with all this free time?! Therefore I decided I’d shoot some ideas on the blog not only for me but also for many of you who may be in the same hole as I! Hit the jump for my top 5 things to do this summer…

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Is There Such Thing as a Good Dictatorship?

   Imagine a small child which grows more and more each day. This child has 2 parents which both have conflicting styles of parenting but all wish for the same thing which is for the child to grow up to be both happy and successful. The mother is the soft touch who the child goes to when they need an advance on their pocket money. This gives the child essentially what they want but not however what they need. This is where the father intervenes and gives the child ‘tough love’ which in turn instates an air of self discipline and responsibility in the child which may not be what it wants, but it’s most certainly what it needs. However, such a instatement of discipline cannot be made so long as there is the other parent who the child can run to.

   Imagine this child was in fact not a child at all. Imagine this child was the UK economy…

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Need an idea for that great birthday present?
Just purchase George Osborne’s tear! Only £10,000,000.00 + pp
Condition: Used*
*no onions were harmed in the production of this tear.

Need an idea for that great birthday present?

Just purchase George Osborne’s tear! Only £10,000,000.00 + pp

Condition: Used*

*no onions were harmed in the production of this tear.

The National Minimum Wage: More Harm Than Good?

   The UK introduced the National Minimum Wage Act in 1998 following the disintegration of many of the trade unions who once were the main force in negotiating wages. The newly created law was enforced by the Low Pay Commission who ensured all workers at the time above the age of 22 received £3.60 an hour.

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The act was created with good intentions. The government wanted to ensure their people were not being exploited with low wages for their labour once the unions stopped bargaining on their behalf. However, the policy has been criticised (especially by free market economists such as Walter Williams) who believe it does more damage than good.

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Should the UK Legalise Cannabis?

   Cannabis is the most widely used illegal drug in the UK. It is usually smoked with a tobacco mix and it’s consumption brings about feelings of relaxation, happiness and heightened senses. The drug is a class B drug, meaning it is illegal to sell, consume and posses yet according to statistics in the UN world drug report, 6.6% of 16-59 year olds in England and Wales consume cannabis annually. This is an astonishing figure for a drug which could put a UK dealer in prison for up to 14 years.

   With that said, the cannabis industry has been titled ‘the only growth industry left in the UK’. In the past two years, the police have seized a total of 1,096,797 marijuana crops, with a total street value of £207,386,447. If this is only the produce the police are seizing, it makes one question the value of the true underground industry in Britain. It must be outstandingly massive, which brings me to my extremely complex question: why don’t we just make marijuana legal?

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   Could the legalisation of this class B drug be the breath of life our economy needs?

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I can’t hammer this home enough. A recession is not when something bad happens. A recession is not when people are poor.

A recession is when markets fail to clear. We have workers without factories and factories without workers. We have cars without drivers and drivers without cars. We have homes without families and families without their own home.

Prices clear markets. If there is a recession, something is wrong with prices.

Reblogged from Money Is Not Important

A world of currencies.

Reblogged from What's Next?

British youth gone soft?

   I was reading The Economist this week and came across a very interesting and relevant article about the british youth of today. The article in question cites that the British youth have turned responsible in comparison to their predecessors in the 60s/70s. I really wanted to present my view on it…

   In the 70s, the youth had it much easier than we do today. My uncle who was a teenager during the period left school with ZERO qualifications. He then went on to earn £30 a week in a factory job which he easily managed to get. £5 of that amount would go to his mum for board and with the other £25, he could keep his motorbike on the road, go out with friends every night to the pub, smoke and save for a holiday away. His prospects were great, if he worked hard, he could easily excel to factory manager and better his salary, which he eventually did and is a senior member of staff for a printing firm. The relatively high wages, rise of the drug market, newly accessible contraceptives and influx of nightclubs meant his generation were also more rebellious than ever. The youth were carefree… 

   Today however is a different story…

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